Thursday, 12/6/18- A Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Lesson Question

How can we slow energy transfer into a cup?

Lesson Tasks

  1. Do Now– Open your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Criteria & Constraints” p.39 (Right Side). Head p.39 properly with “Criteria & Constraints-12/6/18.″
  2. Introduce Design Criteria & Constraints– We have learned a lot about how energy transfers from one substance into another because our goal is to design a cup that keeps drinks cold, preventing energy transfer. Although we want our cup to be as effective as possible, we want the cup to be usable under real-world conditions. The Cold Cup Challenge has several design criteria and constraints that we must keep in mind as we design our cups. Criteria are actions or things that proposed solutions are supposed to satisfy to be successful.  Constraints provide boundaries for what solutions can satisfy the design criteria. Summarize the rationales for each design criterion or constraint on Part I of the handout. Tape the handout to ISN p.39.
  3. Review Initial Cup Design– Turn to ISN p.22. Review what you had proposed in your initial design. You will be using what you have learned in class to revise your design. Then we will build and test our cups to see how well they work. We will then consider how we might revise our designs based on what we figure out.
  4. Identify Useful Model Ideas– Use your model tracker on ISN p.18-21 to review what you’ve learned that might be useful in your cup design. Record the model ideas and the evidence for them in the data table for Part 2.
  5. Brainstorm Data to Test for Effectiveness– How will we know if our designs are better than the original plastic cups or as good as the new cups? What type of data should we collect? How can we test our designs to see how well they minimize energy transfer to the cold drinks? Record your ideas for data to collect and what the data tell us in the data table for Part 3.
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Wednesday, 11/21/18- B Day- Early Dismissal Schedule- Happy Thanksgiving

 

Thanksgiving Science!

  1. Do Now– Ask the person who sits next to you if he or she will eat turkey tomorrow. If not, what will be eaten instead? Also find out if he or she prefers apple pie or pumpkin pie or no pie at all.
  2. Model– Look at our class consensus model for how a drink warms up in a regular cup. With your Cold Cup Design Challenge group, model how you now think the drink in the cup is warming up.
  3. Science FridayMeet the Balloonatics
  4. Educational video– Does tryptophan in turkey make you drowsy?Chem Matters: Flavor Chemistry- The Science Behind the Taste and Smell of Food5 Tips for a Better Thanksgiving, and Thanksgiving Chemistry

 

Friday, 10/26/18- A Day

Lesson Question

What’s happening to the drink as it warms up?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Get out your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Time Series Model” p.26 (Left Side). Head p.26 properly with “Time Series Model-10/26/18.” Science Joke of the Week- Do you know what the problem is with a book on helium?
  2. Science FridayTurning the Tide on Jellyfish Stings
  3. Time Series Model– We’re going to model the phenomenon of a cold drink warming up and explain what’s happening to the water as it warms up from cold to room temperature over time. Set up ISN p.26. When drawing your model, think of the observations you made investigating food coloring in different temperature water. Consider the following: ways to represent particles, amount of kinetic energy, space between particles, different kinds of movement, etc. After drawing your model, check your time series model with your evidence by answering the following three questions on ISN p.26: What did our temperature measurements from the cups tell us? What did our observations of food coloring tell us might be different about cold & warm water? What did our observations of the visualization tell us might be different about cold & warm water?

Thursday, 10/25/18- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Lesson Question

What’s happening to the drink as it warms up?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Get out your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Lab Diagram” p.24 (Left Side). Head p.24 properly with “Lab Diagram-Warming Up-10/25/18″.
  2. Initial Ideas Discussion– Share our observations of what we saw by describing those observations clearly. Make sure we saw similar things and see if anyone noticed something different from other groups. Each group share an observation. Then share explanations for how & why food coloring moved in water & why it moved differently.
  3. Lab Diagram & Scientific Language Key Term– Set up ISN p.24. Draw zoomed-in bubbles to use as a model. Observe the Heating and Cooling a Liquid simulation. It may help us explain our food coloring observations. Think about how to draw particles and how to represent different kinds of motion of particles. Water is made of the same type of particle, so how is warm water different than cold water? Model these differences in your zoomed-in bubble. Introduce key term- kinetic energy. Add definition on ISN p.24.
  4. Brain Break Video SegmentCan You Trust Your Eyes?, Can You Trust Your Ears?Will This Trick Your Ears?
  5. Set up Index– Count back 6 pages from end. Label first of those pages on top- Index. Draw a cross with a ruler to separate each page into 4 boxes. There should be 24 boxes. Label each box with a letter of the alphabet. Double up Q/R and X/Y. There should be one letter for each box with the exception of Q/R and X/Y. Now you are ready to enter the vocabulary word- Kinetic Energy p.24.
  6. Self-Reflection for ISN- MP1– Go to your Google Classroom for this task.
  7. Exit Tweet– What’s happening to the drink as it warms up?

Home Learning

ISN Self-Reflection in Google Classroom is due tomorrow, 10/26

Thursday, 10/11/18- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Question:

Do you think the new thicker plastic cup works better? Why or why not?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Get out your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Initial Model” p.16 (Left Side). Head p.16 properly with “Cup Contrast Initial Model-10/11/18″.
  2. Share “What We Notice” Observations- Share what you noticed about the cups. While we share, add to your list on ISN p.17.
  3. Model Thick & Thin Plastic Cups– We’re starting to see that maybe the new cup works better to keep drinks cool, but let’s try to explain why it works better. Draw a diagrammatic model of the cups. The model is not just a drawing of the cups. It needs to explain how and why the new cup works better than the regular cup. Think about the ideas that you shared and see if you can draw a model to explain why the new cup may work better than the old cup. Label the parts of the model and use words to explain what’s happening. Remember that your models should explain the parts of the cup that help/do not help keep the drink cold. Draw your initial models on ISN p.16.
  4. Compare Models- In groups of 3, compare your models. Use the “Communicating in Scientific Ways” sentence starters to share your ideas & ask questions about other models. Focus on the “Observe” (#2) and “Ask Why and How?” (#1) questions. Trim & tape the “Communicating in Scientific Ways” handout onto ISN p.14. Add “Communication Prompts” p.14 to the Table of Contents.
  5. Brainstorm “What We Wonder” questions– Work in your group of 3 to generate & record “What We Wonder” questions. One approach is for each “What We Notice” entry, to think about a question that you can investigate to help you better understand your observation. Record your questions in the “What We Wonder” column. One member from each group will share one question to record on the class “What We Wonder” chart.

Home Learning:

Google Classroom Classwork Post- Identify objects around your home that do a good job of keeping things cold or warm. Make a list on a separate paper to share tomorrow.

Period 6 only

Question:

Do you think the new thicker plastic cup works better? Why or why not?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now and Do Now– Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Get out your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Cup Contrast” p.17 (Right Side). Head p.17 properly with “Cup Contrast Classroom Test-10/11/18″. Get out your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Initial Model” p.16 (Left Side). Head p.16 properly with “Cup Contrast Initial Model-10/11/18″.
  2. Introduce Problem– I enjoy a cold iced coffee from the Doughnut Inn, but the ice melts quickly and the drink waters down & warms up. The shop sells a new cup that they claim keeps a drink colder for a longer time. So I buy one, but it’s expensive! I’m wondering whether the new cup really works better. Turn & Talk- Do you think the new cup works better? Why or why not?
  3. Set up ISN p.17– Write the question- Why is the new cup better than the regular cup? Set up the data table. Set up a T-chart below the Data Table with “What We Notice” and “What We Wonder.”
  4. Demonstration– Cup Contrast Classroom Test- Record initial temperature of ice water in each of the following containers- regular plastic cup, new thick plastic cup, thin metal cup (like water bottles), thick metal cup (like thermos). Write down things you can see or feel in the “What we notice” column. Record second and third temperatures.  Share “What we notice” with full class. While we share, add to your list on ISNp.17.
  5. Model Thick & Thin Plastic Cups– We’re starting to see that maybe the new cup works better to keep drinks cool, but let’s try to explain why it works better. Draw a diagrammatic model of the cups. The model is not just a drawing of the cups. It needs to explain how and why the new cup works better than the regular cup. Think about the ideas that you shared and see if you can draw a model to explain why the new cup may work better than the old cup. Label the parts of the model and use words to explain what’s happening. Remember that your models should explain the parts of the cup that help/do not help keep the drink cold. Draw your initial models on ISNp.16.
  6. Compare Models- In groups of 3, compare your models. Use the “Communicating in Scientific Ways” sentence starters to share your ideas & ask questions about other models. Focus on the “Observe” (#2) and “Ask Why and How?” (#1) questions. Trim & tape the “Communicating in Scientific Ways” handout onto ISNp.14. Add “Communication Prompts” p.14 to the Table of Contents.
  7. Brainstorm “What We Wonder” questions– Work in your group of 3 to generate & record “What We Wonder” questions. One approach is for each “What We Notice” entry, to think about a question that you can investigate to help you better understand your observation. Record your questions in the “What We Wonder” column. One member from each group will share one question to record on the class “What We Wonder” chart.

Home Learning:

Google Classroom Classwork Post- Identify objects around your home that do a good job of keeping things cold or warm. Make a list on a separate paper to share tomorrow.

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