Thursday, 4/23/19- B Day- NGSS Test- Block Schedule Period 8 (test), 4, 6, & 2

Lesson Question:

How are the laws of motion and forces used to plan and execute space missions like the Mars Curiosity Rover?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “DQST p.70″ (Left Side), “DQST p.71” (Right Side), “DQST p.72” (Left Side), and “DQST p.73” (Right Side).
  2. Identify Related Phenomena/Write-Pair-Share– Where else does this happen? Think of other times when you experienced falling and landing objects. WRITE a brief description of times you can think of when you observed falling objects on ISN p.68. Try to come up with ones that make you wonder why/how it happened. PAIR with your table partner to share your related phenomena and be prepared to SHARE an example or two with the class for the Class Record of Related Phenomena.
  3. Develop Questions/Driving Question Board– What do we need to figure out to explain all of this? Brainstorm “What We Wonder” questions about falling & landing objects and make a list of those questions on ISN p.68. For each of your observations on ISN p.69, think about a question that you can investigate to help you better understand it. Choose the most compelling or interesting question from ISN p.68 and write it big and bold on a notecard using a marker. Write your initials and period number in pencil on the front corner of the card. Bring your card to the scientists’ circle. Read your question and post it on the Driving Question Board (DQB). Explain how it is related to another question on the board.
  4. Driving Question Summary Table (DQST)– Set up the DQST on ISN pages 70-73 for the driving question: How are the laws of motion and forces used to plan and execute space missions like the Mars Curiosity Rover?
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Wednesday, 5/22/19- A Day- NGSS Test- Block Schedule Periods 3 (test), 1, 5, & 7

Lesson Question:

How are the laws of motion and forces used to plan and execute space missions like the Mars Curiosity Rover?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “DQST p.70″ (Left Side), “DQST p.71” (Right Side), “DQST p.72” (Left Side), and “DQST p.73” (Right Side).
  2. Identify Related Phenomena/Write-Pair-Share– Where else does this happen? Think of other times when you experienced falling and landing objects. WRITE a brief description of times you can think of when you observed falling objects on ISN p.68. Try to come up with ones that make you wonder why/how it happened. PAIR with your table partner to share your related phenomena and be prepared to SHARE an example or two with the class for the Class Record of Related Phenomena.
  3. Develop Questions/Driving Question Board– What do we need to figure out to explain all of this? Brainstorm “What We Wonder” questions about falling & landing objects and make a list of those questions on ISN p.68. For each of your observations on ISN p.69, think about a question that you can investigate to help you better understand it. Choose the most compelling or interesting question from ISN p.68 and write it big and bold on a notecard using a marker. Write your initials and period number in pencil on the front corner of the card. Bring your card to the scientists’ circle. Read your question and post it on the Driving Question Board (DQB). Explain how it is related to another question on the board.
  4. Driving Question Summary Table (DQST)– Set up the DQST on ISN pages 70-73 for the driving question: How are the laws of motion and forces used to plan and execute space missions like the Mars Curiosity Rover?

Wednesday, 2/20/19- A Day- Block Schedule Periods 1, 3, 5, & 7

Lesson Question:

What happens when objects collide?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Copy down your Home Learning assignment in your planner. Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “DQST p.50″ (Left Side), “DQST p.51” (Right Side), “DQST p.52” (Left Side), and “DQST p.53” (Right Side).
  2. Class Consensus Initial Model– Together, let’s look at samples of models in Google Slides so we can see if our explanations agree and in what areas we disagree. From that discussion, we will build a Class Consensus Initial Model. Tape your model as a flip page to ISN p.48.
  3. Develop Questions/Driving Question Board– What do we need to figure out to explain all of this? Brainstorm “What We Wonder” questions about colliding objects and make a list of those questions on ISN p.48. For each of your observations on ISN p.49, think about a question that you can investigate to help you better understand it. Choose the most compelling or interesting question from ISN p.48 and write it big and bold on a notecard using a marker. Write your initials and period number in pencil on the front corner of the card. Bring your card to the scientists’ circle. Read your question and post it on the Driving Question Board (DQB). Explain how it is related to another question on the board.
  4. Driving Question Summary Table (DQST)– Set up the DQST on ISN pages 50-53 for the driving question: How can we design a crash protection device to absorb enough energy during a car crash to save lives?

Home Learning

Ideas for Investigation/Next Steps– Which of the questions from ISN p.48 or from the Driving Question Board (DQB) would you like to investigate further? What would you like to do to investigate any of those questions? (See Question in Classwork in Google Classroom under Today topic.)

Tuesday, 2/19/19- B Day

Lesson Question:

What happens when objects collide?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Copy down your Home Learning assignment in your planner. Get out your science notebook and add to the NEW Table of Contents- “Crash Test Model, Questions p.48 (Left Side). Head page 48 properly with “Crash Test-Initial Model, Related Phenomena, Questions-2/19/19.”
  2. Attempt to Make Sense/Initial Explanation/Model– Let’s attempt to make sense of what we noticed when objects collide. How can you explain what you saw? On a piece of blank copy paper, draw a diagrammatic model of what you think is happening when objects collide. It’s not just a drawing of objects colliding; it needs to explain what happens when objects collide. Label the parts of the model and use words to explain what’s happening. In groups of 2 or 3, compare your models. Use the “Communicating in Scientific Ways” sentence starters on ISN p.14 to share your ideas & ask questions about other models. Focus on the “Observe” (#2) and “Ask Why and How?” (#1) questions.
  3. Identify Related Phenomena/Write-Pair-ShareWhere else does this happen? Think of other times when you experienced collisions. WRITE a brief description of times you can think of when you observed crashing objects on ISN p.48. Try to come up with ones that make you wonder why/how it happened. PAIR with your table partner to share your related phenomena and be prepared to SHARE an example or two with the class for the Class Record of Related Phenomena.
  4. Develop Questions/Driving Question Board– What do we need to figure out to explain all of this? Brainstorm “What We Wonder” questions about colliding objects and make a list of those questions on ISN p.48. For each of your observations on ISN p.49, think about a question that you can investigate to help you better understand it. Choose the most compelling or interesting question from ISN p.48 and write it big and bold on a notecard using a marker. Write your initials and period number in pencil on the front corner of the card. Bring your card to the scientists’ circle. Read your question and post it on the Driving Question Board (DQB). Explain how it is related to another question on the board.

Home Learning

Ideas for Investigation/Next Steps– Which of the questions from ISN p.48 or from the Driving Question Board (DQB) would you like to investigate further? What would you like to do to investigate any of those questions? (See Question in Classwork in Google Classroom under Today topic.)

Thursday, 1/24/19- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Lesson Question

How can we model energy transfer into a cold drink?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Open your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Final Energy Transfer Model p.45” (Right Side). Head p.45 properly with “Final Energy Transfer Model 1/24/19.”
  2. Turn and Talk– What have we figured out about the cold drink warming up?
  3. Model– How can we model energy transfer into the cold drink? You will draw two detailed diagrams of the cups to explain how energy got inside the cold drink. On ISN p.45, draw one model that shows a cup with one wall and one model of a cup with two walls. Answer the following questions below your models on ISN p.45 or on a flip page: How is the energy getting into the cups in your diagrams? Where does the energy come from? What happens to the energy that gets absorbed into the cups? What happens to the energy that does not get absorbed into the cups? How is the energy getting into the cold drink from the cups? How is the cup with two walls different from the cup with one wall?
  4. Presentation of Models/Consensus-Building Discussion– 3-4 student scientists present their models to the class and explain all elements of their model, using questions as a guide. What did you notice that was similar across all the models? What did you notice that was different?
  5. Brain Break- The Color of That Dress SciShow
  6. Model Tracker– What have we figured out that helps us answer the question “How can we model energy transfer into a cold drink?” Summarize the main model ideas about energy transfer that we figured out in the consensus model. Add to the Model Tracker on ISN pages 18-19 (or continue to pages 20-21).
  7. Driving Question Board (DQB)– What questions can we answer now? What are we still wondering about?
  8. Exit Ticket– How can we design a cup to keep a drink cold? Write an answer to the question now, and use evidence from your investigations to explain your response.

Home Learning

Unit Assessment on Friday, 1/25