Thursday, 6/1/17- A Day

Core Ideas:

  • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law).
  • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion.
  • All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared.

Learning Activities:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “Understanding Car Crashes p.86” (Left Side) and “Understanding Car Crashes p.87” (Right Side). Head page 86 properly with “Understanding Car Crashes-Connections & Questions-6/1/17 and head page 87 properly with “Understanding Car Crashes- Advanced Organizer-6/1/17.”
  2. Driving Question Summary Table– Complete the Summary Table on pages 80-81 for the “Forced to Accelerate” (Newton’s second law, acceleration) activities on pages 84-85.
  3. Educational videoUnderstanding Car Crashes- It’s Basic Physics– Complete the advanced organizer while watching the video. Tape the organizer as a flip page to p.87. After watching the video, answer the question on page 86: “Which would have been more damaging to the truck: having a head-on collision with an identical truck traveling at an identical speed or driving head-on into the stationary security pillar? Explain.”

Thursday, 5/18/17- B Day

Core Ideas:

  • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law).
  • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion.
  • All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared.

Learning Activities:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “What Forced to Accelerate p.85” (Right Side). Head page 85 properly with “Forced to Accelerate-Investigation-5/18/17.”
  2. Driving Question Summary Table– Complete the Summary Table on pages 80-81 for the “What causes motion” (Newton’s first law, inertia) activities on pages 82-83.
  3. Investigation– Forced to Accelerate- How is acceleration related to force?- Record key question and set up data table on page 85 of science notebook. Follow the procedure.

Monday, 5/15/17- A Day

Core Ideas:

  • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law).
  • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion.
  • All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared.

Learning Activities:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “Driving Questions Summary Table- p.80” (Left Side) and “Driving Question Summary Table p.81” (Right Side). Open your science notebook to pages 80-81 and the “Motion, Forces, & Energy” textbook to page 36.
  2. Driving Question Board (DQB)– Retrieve post-it questions from your group’s poster, and write others if you have more. Put all your questions on DQB and organize the questions to come up with a driving question about motion and forces.
  3. Driving Question Summary Table– Set up Driving Question Summary Table on pages 80-81.
  4. Textbook Assignment– Read pages 36-39. Define key words on page 36. Answer all questions 1-2 on page 39.

Tuesday, 5/2/17- B Day- SBAC Testing Schedule

SBAC Schedule
8:23-9:58 SBAC (No Periods 6 & 7)
10:01-10:47 Period 5
10:50-11:36 Period 4
11:41-1:01 (includes lunch as usual with usual times) Period 2
1:04-1:50 Period 3
1:53-2:45 Period 1

Core Ideas:

  • Each atom has a charged sub-structure consisting of a nucleus, which is made of protons and neutrons, surrounded by electrons.
  • The periodic table orders elements horizontally by the number of protons in the atom’s nucleus and places those with similar chemical properties in columns. The repeating patterns of this table reflect patterns of outer electron states.

Learning Activities (Periods 2 & 3):

  1. Do Now–Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Get out your science notebook and open to your Periodic Table on page 73. Looking at your periodic table on page 73, the atoms of what element have 20 protons? How many electrons do those atoms have? How many neutrons?
  2. Comparison– Observe the chemical reaction of different elements and relate this to their location on the periodic table: sodium & potassium in water vs calcium in water
  3. Notebook Work– Tape Energy Levels Elements 1-20 activity handout as a flip page to page 77.
  4. Driving Question Summary Table– Complete the Summary Table on pages 68-69 for the Energy Levels Activities on pages 76-77.
  5. Group Summary– One student take out a sheet of paper and write the first sentence of a summary of what he or she learned about atoms and the periodic table. Then pass it to the right and pick up where the last student left off. Keep going until you complete a summary of what your cooperative table group learned.

Learning Activities (Period 4):

  1. Do Now– Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Get out your science notebook and open to the beginning of the Atoms and Periodic Table unit on page 66.
  2. Peer-Review of Unit on Atoms & the Periodic Table- Review your partner’s unit “Atoms & the Periodic Table” on pages 66-77 in his or her Interactive Science Notebook. Use the handout “Peer Review of Interactive Science Notebook” to give your partner feedback.
  3. Self Reflection for Unit on Atoms & the Periodic Table- Review your Unit “Atoms & the Periodic Table” on pages 66-77 in your Interactive Science Notebook. Use the Google Doc “Self-Reflection for the Unit on Atoms & the Periodic Table” to type your responses to the questions in the light gray boxes.

Homework:

  • Atoms and Periodic Table Quiz on Thursday 5/4 (Periods 2, 3, & 4) and Friday 5/5 (Periods 6 & 7)
  • Science Notebooks due Thursday 5/4 (Periods 2, 3, & 4) and Friday 5/5 (Periods 6 & 7)

Monday, 5/1/17- A Day- SBAC Testing Schedule

SBAC Schedule
8:23-9:58 SBAC (No Periods 2 & 3)
10:01-10:47 Period 1
10:50-11:36 Period 4
11:41-1:01 (includes lunch as usual with usual times) Period 5
1:04-1:50 Period 6
1:53-2:45 Period 7

Core Ideas:

  • Each atom has a charged sub-structure consisting of a nucleus, which is made of protons and neutrons, surrounded by electrons.
  • The periodic table orders elements horizontally by the number of protons in the atom’s nucleus and places those with similar chemical properties in columns. The repeating patterns of this table reflect patterns of outer electron states.

Learning Activities:

  1. Do Now–Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Get out your science notebook and open to your Periodic Table on page 73. Looking at your periodic table on page 73, the atoms of what element have 20 protons? How many electrons do those atoms have? How many neutrons?
  2. Comparison– Observe the chemical reaction of different elements and relate this to their location on the periodic table: sodium & potassium in water vs calcium in water
  3. Notebook Work– Tape Energy Levels Elements 1-20 activity handout as a flip page to page 77.
  4. Driving Question Summary Table– Complete the Summary Table on pages 68-69 for the Energy Levels Activities on pages 76-77.
  5. Group Summary– One student take out a sheet of paper and write the first sentence of a summary of what he or she learned about atoms and the periodic table. Then pass it to the right and pick up where the last student left off. Keep going until you complete a summary of what your cooperative table group learned.

Homework:

  • Atoms and Periodic Table Quiz on Thursday 5/4 (Periods 2, 3, & 4) and Friday 5/5 (Periods 6 & 7)
  • Science Notebooks due Thursday 5/4 (Periods 2, 3, & 4) and Friday 5/5 (Periods 6 & 7)