Monday, 2/11/19- B Day

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Put your name on your paper and answer the following question:Describe what happens to matter when it changes state. Give an example.
  2. State of Matter Changes HyperDocComplete the model that describes/explains the particular change of state phenomenon that you and your partner chose. Don’t forget that your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  3. Scientists’ Circle– Each student/pair will present one of their models to the rest of the student scientists. We will come to a consensus about what happens to matter when it changes state.
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Friday, 2/8/18- A Day- Wear Red!

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now
  2. Science Friday- What is a Flame?
  3. State of Matter Changes HyperDoc on Google Classroom- pink EXPLAIN section-After using the resources above, collaborate with no more than two other students to develop a model on the paper given that describes/explains: the hardening of molten metal OR the “smoke” you see when you breathe in cold air. Your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  4. Public Representations- Making Your Changes in Thinking Visible- Sticky Note Feedback for Models

Thursday, 2/7/19- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now
  2. State of Matter Changes HyperDoc on Google Classroom- pink EXPLAIN section-After using the resources above, collaborate with no more than two other students to develop a model on the paper given that describes/explains: the liquifying of candle wax OR a puddle drying up in the sun. Your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  3. Public Representations- Making Your Changes in Thinking Visible- Sticky Note Feedback for Models
  4.  Educational Video- Bill Nye Water Cycle

Home Learning

Final models will be handed in on Friday 2/8.

Wednesday, 2/6/19- A Day- Block Schedule Periods 1, 3, 5, & 7

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now
  2. State of Matter Changes HyperDoc on Google Classroom- pink EXPLAIN section-After using the resources above, collaborate with no more than two other students to develop a model on the paper given that describes/explains: the liquifying of candle wax OR a puddle drying up in the sun AND the hardening of molten metal OR the “smoke” you see when you breathe in cold air. Your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  3. Public Representations- Making Your Changes in Thinking Visible- Sticky Note Feedback for Models
  4.  Educational Video- Bill Nye Water Cycle

Home Learning

Final models will be handed in on Friday 2/8.

Thursday, 1/24/19- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Lesson Question

How can we model energy transfer into a cold drink?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Open your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Final Energy Transfer Model p.45” (Right Side). Head p.45 properly with “Final Energy Transfer Model 1/24/19.”
  2. Turn and Talk– What have we figured out about the cold drink warming up?
  3. Model– How can we model energy transfer into the cold drink? You will draw two detailed diagrams of the cups to explain how energy got inside the cold drink. On ISN p.45, draw one model that shows a cup with one wall and one model of a cup with two walls. Answer the following questions below your models on ISN p.45 or on a flip page: How is the energy getting into the cups in your diagrams? Where does the energy come from? What happens to the energy that gets absorbed into the cups? What happens to the energy that does not get absorbed into the cups? How is the energy getting into the cold drink from the cups? How is the cup with two walls different from the cup with one wall?
  4. Presentation of Models/Consensus-Building Discussion– 3-4 student scientists present their models to the class and explain all elements of their model, using questions as a guide. What did you notice that was similar across all the models? What did you notice that was different?
  5. Brain Break- The Color of That Dress SciShow
  6. Model Tracker– What have we figured out that helps us answer the question “How can we model energy transfer into a cold drink?” Summarize the main model ideas about energy transfer that we figured out in the consensus model. Add to the Model Tracker on ISN pages 18-19 (or continue to pages 20-21).
  7. Driving Question Board (DQB)– What questions can we answer now? What are we still wondering about?
  8. Exit Ticket– How can we design a cup to keep a drink cold? Write an answer to the question now, and use evidence from your investigations to explain your response.

Home Learning

Unit Assessment on Friday, 1/25