Tuesday, 4/23/19- B Day

Lesson Question:

What happens when objects collide? How can we design a crash protection device to absorb enough energy during a car crash to save lives?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Get out your signed field trip permission form. How will the vehicles react in the following situation? Write your name and your answer on the piece of paper. Two cars of equal mass and moving at the same speed collide head-to-head.
  2. Reading Comprehension– “Air Pressure” ReadWorks article- In preparation for our field trip to the New England Air Museum, we’re going to learn a little about flight. To understand how flight works, we have to take a look again at air, something that we investigated when we studied about matter. And when looking at air, and more specifically air pressure, we are also taking a look at collisions. So keep in mind what we’ve been learning about speed, velocity, acceleration, and momentum as we read about the collisions of air particles.

Home Learning:

  • Motion Summative Assessment on Friday, 4/26– STUDY ISN pages 47-59
  • Get Field Trip Permission Form signed- due Friday, 4/26
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Monday, 2/11/19- B Day

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Put your name on your paper and answer the following question:Describe what happens to matter when it changes state. Give an example.
  2. State of Matter Changes HyperDocComplete the model that describes/explains the particular change of state phenomenon that you and your partner chose. Don’t forget that your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  3. Scientists’ Circle– Each student/pair will present one of their models to the rest of the student scientists. We will come to a consensus about what happens to matter when it changes state.

Friday, 2/8/18- A Day- Wear Red!

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now
  2. Science Friday- What is a Flame?
  3. State of Matter Changes HyperDoc on Google Classroom- pink EXPLAIN section-After using the resources above, collaborate with no more than two other students to develop a model on the paper given that describes/explains: the hardening of molten metal OR the “smoke” you see when you breathe in cold air. Your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  4. Public Representations- Making Your Changes in Thinking Visible- Sticky Note Feedback for Models

Thursday, 2/7/19- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now
  2. State of Matter Changes HyperDoc on Google Classroom- pink EXPLAIN section-After using the resources above, collaborate with no more than two other students to develop a model on the paper given that describes/explains: the liquifying of candle wax OR a puddle drying up in the sun. Your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  3. Public Representations- Making Your Changes in Thinking Visible- Sticky Note Feedback for Models
  4.  Educational Video- Bill Nye Water Cycle

Home Learning

Final models will be handed in on Friday 2/8.

Wednesday, 2/6/19- A Day- Block Schedule Periods 1, 3, 5, & 7

Learning Goal:

Students will be able to create a model that explains what happens to particle motion, temperature, and states of matter when heat energy is added or removed.

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now
  2. State of Matter Changes HyperDoc on Google Classroom- pink EXPLAIN section-After using the resources above, collaborate with no more than two other students to develop a model on the paper given that describes/explains: the liquifying of candle wax OR a puddle drying up in the sun AND the hardening of molten metal OR the “smoke” you see when you breathe in cold air. Your model should feature the following changes: Particle motion, temperature, change of state of matter. Your model should include the following: Observable and unobservable features; The passing of time (ex. before-during-after); A key to show how you are representing different things (ex. How are you representing particles? What is showing temperature?); Writing- Explain how the evidence from your explorations supports your model.
  3. Public Representations- Making Your Changes in Thinking Visible- Sticky Note Feedback for Models
  4.  Educational Video- Bill Nye Water Cycle

Home Learning

Final models will be handed in on Friday 2/8.