Monday, 4/29/19- B Day

Lesson Question

How can engineers use their understanding of air pressure to make airplanes fly?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “Air Pressure p.63” (Right Side). Head page 63 properly with “Air Pressure-Outline-4/29/19.”
  2. Air Pressure Outline/Google Slides– Use the Outline template to take notes on the Air Pressure Google Slides.
  3. Notebook Work– Trim & tape outline to ISN p.63. Add the following scientific language terms to Index: Air pressure and Bernoulli’s Principle.
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Monday, 2/25/19- B Day

Lesson Question:

How do different factors affect an object’s speed? How does an object’s speed affect its impact?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do NowCopy down your Home Learning assignment in your planner. Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “Calculating Speed p.55 (Right Side). Head page 55 properly with “Calculating Speed-Investigation-2/25/19.”
  2. Scientists’ Circle– Looking back- What did we just do? Looking forward- What are our next steps?
  3. Video/Scientific Language Key WordCheck for Understanding-Watch “Expedition 2: A Universe of Motion” to meet Matt Brumbelow, a research engineer. Record the lesson question on ISNp.55. Set up ISN p.55 to record the definitions of the following scientific language keywords: reference point, displacement, distance, speed, velocity. Record the same terms and page numbers in the Index in the back of your ISN. Also, set up ISN p.55 to answer the “Check for Understanding” questions on the reading assignments.
  4. Crash Protection Device Design Challenge– Your goal is to design a crash protection device that will absorb enough energy during a car crash to save lives. What materials do you want to use? Why will those work? Are there design features you want to include? Use ISN p.54 to draw an initial design model and ask questions you could investigate to find answers that will help your design. You do not need to agree on a design right now.

Home Learning:

Read the “Calculating Speed and Determining Velocity Lab” posted in Google Classroom (in Classwork Tab under Today).

Thursday, 1/10/19- A Day- Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Lesson Question

How is energy getting into the cup, if not from collisions with air?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Open your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- Lamp Demonstration p.43 (Right Side). Head p.43 properly with “Lamp Demonstration 1/10/19.”
  2. Write-Pair-Share– What did we figure out was missing from our model for energy transfer into the cold drink? On ISN p.43, record the following question:  “How is energy getting into the cup, if not from collisions with air particles? If air is bad at transferring energy through particle collisions, how is energy getting into the cup in the first place?”
  3. Scientific Language Key Word– On ISN p.43, record the definition of Radiation– Energy transfer by invisible waves that carry energy between stuff that isn’t touching. Ex. Between you and a fire, heater, or the sun. Record the term Radiation in the Index in the back of your ISN.
  4. Lamp Demonstration– Observe this demonstration for evidence of radiation. Put your hand a couple feet in front of a lamp with a 100 watt bulb that is turned off. What do you feel? Then turn the bulb on. What do you feel? Diagram radiation from the lamp on ISN p.43. What is happening inside your hand on a particle scale when your hand feels warmer? What do you think is making those particles move faster if air is not colliding with them? How did you represent the invisible waves in your diagrams?
  5. Video Segments– How does a vacuum pump work? Mr. Wizard and What happens if your body is exposed to the vacuum of space? Sci Show
  6. Lamp Analogy Map– On the “Demonstration: The Lamp” student handout, relate the physical model of the lamp to the phenomenon of the Sun in space. Fill in the first row as a class, and then work with your partner to complete the other rows. Then, tape the handout as a flip page to ISN p.43.

Block 8- SEL

  1. Introduction- On a sticky note, list 3 people you admire- someone in the community, a family member, an adult/student in the school, etc.
  2. Word Splash- On your table group, create a Word Splash- a list of words- about the people you admire using words that represent why you admire them.
  3. Video Segment- Inspiring Role Models
  4. Discussion Questions- What are some similarities among all the people you admire? How do personal role models positively influence your life? The people we admire can inspire us. How are you inspired?

Wednesday, 1/9/19- B Day- Block Schedule Periods 1, 3, 5, & 7

Lesson Question

How is energy getting into the cup, if not from collisions with air?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Open your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- Lamp Demonstration p.43 (Right Side). Head p.43 properly with “Lamp Demonstration 1/9/19.”
  2. Write-Pair-Share– What did we figure out was missing from our model for energy transfer into the cold drink? On ISN p.43, record the following question:  “How is energy getting into the cup, if not from collisions with air particles? If air is bad at transferring energy through particle collisions, how is energy getting into the cup in the first place?”
  3. Scientific Language Key Word– On ISN p.43, record the definition of RadiationEnergy transfer by invisible waves that carry energy between stuff that isn’t touching. Ex. Between you and a fire, heater, or the sun. Record the term Radiation in the Index in the back of your ISN.
  4. Lamp Demonstration– Observe this demonstration for evidence of radiation. Put your hand a couple feet in front of a lamp with a 100 watt bulb that is turned off. What do you feel? Then turn the bulb on. What do you feel? Diagram radiation from the lamp on ISN p.43. What is happening inside your hand on a particle scale when your hand feels warmer? What do you think is making those particles move faster if air is not colliding with them? How did you represent the invisible waves in your diagrams?
  5. Video SegmentsHow does a vacuum pump work? Mr. Wizard and What happens if your body is exposed to the vacuum of space? Sci Show
  6. Lamp Analogy Map– On the “Demonstration: The Lamp” student handout, relate the physical model of the lamp to the phenomenon of the Sun in space. Fill in the first row as a class, and then work with your partner to complete the other rows. Then, tape the handout as a flip page to ISN p.43.

Thursday, 11/29/18- B Day Block Schedule Periods 2, 4, 6, & 8

Learning Question

How does energy transfer into a cold drink when it warms up?

Learning Tasks

  1. Do Now– Copy down today’s homework assignment in your planner. Open your ISN and add to the Table of Contents- “Touching Hot & Cold” p.37 (Right Side). Head p.37 properly with “Touching Hot & Cold-11/29/18.″
  2. Consensus Model– Observe individual student scientists’ models in Google slides. What do you notice that is similar across all models? Is there anything that you think is different about your model? We’re going to take stock of the ideas in everyone’s models to build a class consensus model that everyone agrees upon and that explains what happens to cause a drink to warm up inside a cup. Remind students of class norms for productive scientific discussions and refer to the Communicating in Scientific Ways on ISN p.14. As student scientists offer proposals, create a public representation of the consensus model on chart paper. Agree on how we should represent cold and hot, particle motion, temperature as average kinetic energy, etc.
  3. Scientific Language Key Term– Introduce key term- conduction. Add definition below model on ISN p.34- “Heating that happens when two things of different temperatures touch and the particles with more energy collide with particles with less energy and transfer their movement.” Add the key term conduction to Index.
  4. Brain Break– Optical illusions
  5. Modeling Hot and Cold– What are some examples of conduction from our own experiences? Think about times you’ve touched something and it feels hot or it feels cold. When you touch something and it feels hot or it feels cold, the particles from the object and the particles of your hand are colliding. What can we say about conduction when something feels hot? How is it different when something feels cold? Let’s model these ideas! On ISN p.37, draw two models to help explain what is happening to your hands to experience hot or cold. Draw a diagram on the top half for what is happening on a particle scale when you touch something hot like a pot from the stove. Share your model with your partner and then revise, if necessary. Then draw a diagram on the bottom half for what is happening on a particle scale when you touch something cold like an ice cube. Share your mode with your partner then revise.

Home Learning

Study Heat Thermal Energy (ISN pages 16-35) for a quiz tomorrow, 11/30