Tuesday, 4/2/19- B Day

Lesson Question:

What role does mass and velocity play in collisions?

Learning Tasks:

    1. Do Now– Copy down today’s Home Learning tasks in your planner. Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “Examples p.58” (Left Side). Head page 59 properly with “Momentum-Examples-4/2/19.”
    2. Momentum Examples– How will the vehicles react in the following situations? 1. A large truck is stopped on road and a small car hits it from behind. 2. A small car is stopped and hit from behind by a large truck. 3. Two cars of equal mass moving at same speed collide head to head. Pair with your partner to discuss each situation and write a description of how the vehicles will react on ISN p.58. Be prepared to share with the class.
    3. Driving Question Summary Table– Complete the DQST on ISN pgs. 50-51 for the Momentum lab.

Home Learning:

Motion Quiz on Friday, 4/5– STUDY ISN pages 47-59

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Monday, 4/1/19- A Day

Lesson Question:

What role does mass and velocity play in collisions?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and open to page 59. Write your name on the piece of paper and define inertia.
  2. Science FridayWild California Condors and This Fish Sucks
  3.  Review investigations– Moving Man PhET simulation and Momentum lab
  4. Video SegmentsMomentum and Time- The Science of Speed (momentum) and Science of NFL Football- Newton’s First Law of Motion (inertia)

Tuesday, 3/26/19- A Day

Lesson Question:

What role does mass and velocity play in collisions?

Learning Tasks:

  1. Do Now– Copy down today’s Home Learning tasks in your planner. Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “Momentum p.59” (Right Side). Head page 59 properly with “Momentum-Investigation-3/26/19.”
  2. Review The Moving Man: Position, Velocity, Acceleration PhET questions and collect labs.
  3. Reading for Information/Cornell Notes– Explain the format for Cornell notes and set up ISN p.59 with the lesson question- “What role does mass and velocity play in collisions?” Add the following scientific language keywords to the Index in the back of your notebook: momentum & inertia. Model how to use the Cornell notes format, practice together as a full class, then continue individually.

Home Learning:

Complete Cornell Notes on ISN p.59 for Momentum article

Wednesday, 5/17/17- A Day

Core Ideas:

  • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law).
  • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion.
  • All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared.

Learning Activities:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “What Changes Motion? p.82” (Left Side). Head page 82 properly with “What Changes Motion- Connections & Questions-5/17/17.”
  2. Connections & Questions– On page 82, answer the following questions (Write-Pair-Share): What did you learn about the collision between the truck and the security pillar from your investigation of the motion of the cart and the washers? (Try to use new science vocabulary!) What still confuses you?
  3. Textbook Assignment– Read pages 6-15. Define key words on page 6. Answer all questions 1-3 on page 15.

Tuesday, 5/16/17- B Day

Core Ideas:

  • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law).
  • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion.
  • All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared.

Learning Activities:

  1. Do Now– Get out your science notebook and add to the Table of Contents- “What Changes Motion? p.83” (Right Side). Head page 83 properly with “What Changes Motion-Investigation-5/16/17.”
  2. Investigation– What Changes Motion?- Stack several metal washers on top of the cart. Place a heavy book on the table near the cart. Predict what will happen to both the car and the washers if you roll the car into the book. Write your prediction on p.83. Test your prediction. Record your observations on page 83. What happened to the cat when it hit the book? What happened to the washers? What might be the reason for any difference between the motions of the car and the washers? Does changing the mass on the cart affect your observations?
  3. Key Words/Notes- Newton’s first law of motion and inertia. Write key words and explanation as a flip page to page 83. Add to your Index.